Three Things to Consider Before Hiring That Marketing Person

First, what does the position entail? “Marketing”, after all, means different things in different companies. To some firms the Marketing done entails identifying new markets, driving new product development, fielding market communication campaigns, then directing and motivating the sales force. Clearly, they envision a senior executive who would be very near the top of the organization..

At the other extreme, to other companies a “Marketing” person is someone who turns out ads, catalogs, brochures, flyers and so on and do it in-house. That’s what “Marketing Manager” means to these companies.

For most companies the “marketing person” needed is less than senior executive and more than a graphics designer. If your company is in this middle category then you need to consider these questions:

1. Is the marketing need long term and ongoing? Is there a regular monthly workload and will it continue at least two years? Too many companies hire someone to tackle a “huge” volume of work only to see it completed within a year. Then they have to find more for the new hire to do or let them go. Here are a couple of hints;

A. Plot all past marketing projects. When were they completed? If you don’t see an ongoing, steady output of marketing projects, chances are that you don’t need that marketing person.

B. Don’t hire someone just to save on agency or graphic designer costs. When outsiders aren’t working for you, they don’t cost you a thing. Salaries, on the other hand, are a fixed expense.

2. How will you recognize and avoid B- or C grade marketing? You want marketing that will boost sales and rock the competition but what if the new marketing person’s proposals don’t “wow” you? Do you run with them anyhow and hope for the best? Consider this:

A. “Creativity” isn’t all there is marketing. Successful marketing is always based on an insightful marketing strategy. The marketing manager must have both the education and real-world marketing experience to not only understand the strategy but to contribute to its development.. And those credentials don’t come cheap.

B. Creativity is required to implement the strategy but it must not only be attention-getting but must also reflect well on the product and on the company. Mediocre or “cute” creative can blunt the impact of the strategy. That’s why marketers want to see three or more distinct creative approaches.Will you be able to recruit —and afford—that creative a marketing manager?

C. Even creativity should be judged in a business-like manner. Younger, novice marketing managers may not take criticism, let alone rejection, of their pet ideas well. How to spot them? Go through a candidate’s samples and quiz them on why they chose a particular direction. Look for answers that refer to results not design theories. If they seem defensive, you can look forward to hurt feelings and sulking.

3. What if you hire the wrong candidate? In companies that haven’t a good-sized marketing department, there is no one to take up the slack when the marketing person is out, on vacation, or let go. Moreover, marketing people usually interact with only one or two others who are in a position to judge how well they’re doing. That’s why when that marketing person is let go, the reasons are usually not obvious to their co-workers. This uncertainty can affect employee morale. Hints? There aren’t any. Just don’t hire the wrong person.

At the start I wrote ” the bad news is that there are other reasons why adding to your staff may not be best for your company.” Well, the good news is that you can get the marketing you need without a marketing manager.

I’m not proposing that you simply go back to the ad agencies or designers you relied on before you considered hiring a marketing managers. Apply the same business acumen that you employ in the rest of your operations. While marketing services are far from being a commodity, shopping around for the right one… or ones… is easy in these internet days. And, yes, I did write “ones.” Let me explain.

A lot of companies do the same things they did all along because they thought that there were no choices. They’d hire one ad agency. They’d sign a contract. And, believe it or not, some paid a monthly retainer! Wake up, pal! You’re the Customer! You get to call the shots!

Why not hire the marketing expertise you need when you need it? Need a product launch plan? Hire someone who’s done it over and over again. Pay them then say “adios.”

Need a corporate identity campaign? Hire someone to get you that recognition then recognize that, once the mission is accomplished, you no longer need that someone.

Consider this radical idea in terms of the three questions we covered before.

1. Is the marketing need long term and ongoing? It doesn’t matter. Once you’ve settled on the price you can “employ” an outside consultant or agency for a month or a year. Let them go and re-hire them for the next project. What about the cost? Trust me, it’ll always be far cheaper than paying a salary, benefits, and for endless hours of web-surfing.

2. How will you recognize and avoid B- or C grade marketing? Simple. If you don’t like what they bring you, you don’t pay. You send them “back to the drawing board.” No more worrying about hurting someone’s feelings. No more putting up with missed deadlines. You’re the Customer not the Boss. And everyone in sales knows that customers are more demanding than any boss.

3. What if you hire the wrong candidate? Fire a consultant or an agency and not one of your people will care. Best of all, you can hire a replacement before the original is out the door. In fact, you can have more than one agency or marketing mercenary working for you at the same time. The secret? You don’t give anyone your account. You give them a project.

So before you fill that Marketing Manager position, ask yourself ” Why not hire a “temp” first?”

Richard Koranda has driven creative strategies for American Express, Bank of America, CitiCard, Visa, Dreyfus, and Diners Club. His work earned over 60 industry awards for response and creativity. He was also responsible for the highly successful repositioning of Visa “Visa. Its everywhere you want to be”, which led to the brand dominating the bankcard market.

Previously, he headed up UMarketing LLC as Executive Creative Director serving a broad range of clients including Blue Cross, AMA, KaVo Dental America, Blockbuster Music, MicroTek, and Diners Club International, Chase, US Bank, BMO Harris Bank.

Legal Marketing Tips From a Divorce Lawyer

A Divorce Lawyer’s Marketing Journey to Build My Law Practice

During the past few years, I have had a lot of visibility resulting from my marketing efforts. Other attorneys continuously ask me about my marketing so I thought I’d share some thoughts. I have been immersed in the legal world my entire life. I have practiced law in Illinois since 1984, and grew up surrounded by legal talk, as my father was also an attorney. This has allowed me to observe the evolution of the legal field throughout my lifetime.

History of Legal Advertising

As many attorneys are aware, previously, legal advertising was generally prohibited. This did not change until 1977, well after advertising became common practice in most other fields, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on lawyers’ right to advertise their services in the controversial case of

Bates v. State Bar of Arizona (433 U.S. 350). As a result, the tradition against legal advertising was rejected as an antiquated rule of etiquette. Thus began the opportunity for attorneys to grow their practices through marketing.

My Journey Begins

Although legal marketing previously provoked controversy, it has been an important key to my success as a lawyer. I have always marketed my practice. For the majority of my career, I concentrated on traditional methods such as Yellow Page advertising (pre-internet) and networking. As my experience grew, I added peer-rated credentials to my resume and joined different organizations. Fast forward to 2010, when my marketing guru, who also happens to be my wife, expanded her business into the growing field of social media. I jumped at the opportunity to be her online and social media test case. We developed a marketing plan including all the traditional marketing techniques plus newly burgeoning online marketing strategies.

We started with a short list of 13 tasks, and as those were completed, we added many more. Over the past four years, marketing has fascinated me. My marketing list has become an ever-evolving ‘to do’ list and we are always tweaking my marketing plan. We have been especially pleased by the Internet and social media campaigns’ successes. For those interested in starting or building upon a marketing campaign, here are some insights I have gained over the years. Please keep in mind that I am not a marketing professional, just a lawyer like you trying to build my practice.

What are the most important elements of marketing?

Consistency and follow-up are the most important aspects of marketing. You can have all of the know-how, a hefty budget, the best contacts and technical staff; yet, your marketing efforts will not result in success without consistency and follow-up. I have spoken with attorneys who tell me they are going to start their online marketing with blogs posts. They lay their foundation – build a website, write a few blogs posts – but too often, after several months, begin to neglect their page. Likewise, an empty Twitter account, LinkedIn or Facebook fan page is equally useless. Additionally, people often attend networking events, make new contacts, but fail to follow-up. Continuous activity is necessary to achieve your goals.

What types of marketing do I use?

I break my marketing down into two different, but equally relevant, categories: traditional and internet marketing.

Traditional marketing

For me, traditional marketing consists of networking and making myself visible. I think this builds the strongest and longest-lasting referrals. My ultimate goal is to build an extensive network of relationships so that people call me directly for my services or refer clients to me. Additionally, I recognize the importance of being a resource to others. In the networking world, the givers get the most back. For others, traditional marketing may include newspaper ads, speaking engagements, direct mail, television, radio and even billboards.

Internet marketing

The objective of internet marketing is to make my name a prominent presence when people search online for help with the services I provide. My goal is for my web presence to effectively convey who I am and how I can help people, thus influencing people to contact me and ultimately hire me.

Who has time for marketing?

I understand that lawyers need to spend the majority of their hours practicing law. Networking takes a lot of time so you have to marshal your efforts in order to reap the most benefits with the least amount of time. Here are some networking suggestions:

· Be strategic; identify the best people to network with. Read Malcolm Gladwell’s book, The Tipping Point.

· Set and track goals when meeting people or joining networking groups.

· Take time to develop relationships. Always remember that quality, not quantity, is important.

· Be a good listener and ask questions. Find out how you can help that person, whether it is referring business, making an introduction or sending a relevant article.

· Always follow-up and deliver what you promise.

Where do I start my internet campaign?

You can build your online presence through search engine optimization (SEO) and social media. SEO gets your website or web-page noticed by various search engines. Social media uses internet platforms for individuals and groups to share, co-create, and discuss. Social media marketing involves using internet forums, blogs, social networks like Facebook and LinkedIn, podcasts, video and more to build your online presence, identity, relationships and reputation.

What to keep in mind while marketing

Marketing helps bring potential clients into your office to hire you. Satisfied clients bring more clients, and this remains one of the best ways to grow your practice. Thus, it is both good business and good marketing to build solid relationships with your clients. Tips include:

How do seafood processing companies maintain the highest level of safety and hygiene?

This plan should include steps for preventing contamination, identifying and responding to contamination incidents, and cleaning and sanitizing the facility.

Seafood processing companies have to adhere to extremely high safety and hygiene standards in order to maintain their reputation and protect the public.

This is because any contamination can have serious health implications for consumers. Seafood can be contaminated with all sorts of harmful bacteria, including E. coli, salmonella, and listeria. In some cases, these bacteria can cause severe food poisoning symptoms that require hospitalization. In other cases, the bacteria may not cause any immediate symptoms but could still lead to long-term health problems.

That’s why seafood processors need to have a comprehensive food safety plan in place that covers all aspects of their operation. This plan should include steps for preventing contamination, identifying and responding to contamination incidents, and cleaning and sanitizing the facility.

It is also important to have regular training for employees so they know how to follow the safety procedures correctly. This is an important regular task that should also be done when any new employees join the company.

One of the most important things seafood processors can do to maintain safety and hygiene is to regularly test their water supply for bacteria. If harmful bacteria are detected, then the processor needs to take steps to address the issue immediately.

This includes ensuring that all equipment and surfaces in the facility are clean and sanitized, and that employees are following proper hygiene procedures. By taking these precautions, seafood processors can help ensure that their products are safe for consumers.

However, even with the best safety measures in place, accidents can still happen. That’s why it’s important for seafood processors to have a plan in place for responding to contamination incidents. This plan should include steps for recalling and tracing back orders to determine the source of the contamination.

Seafood processors must take steps to ensure that their products are safe for consumers. This includes using clean and sanitized equipment as well as following proper hygiene procedures. By taking these precautions, processors can help reduce the risk of contamination incidents.

These companies use a variety of methods to keep their facilities clean and free of contaminants.

There are many methods that seafood processing companies can implement in order to ensure the highest levels of hygiene standards. These include:

Tracing back orders to determine the source of the contamination
Cleaning and sanitizing all equipment after each use.
Washing hands thoroughly before and after handling seafood
Make sure that all employees are properly trained in hygiene procedures.
Testing seafood for contaminants before it is released for sale
Providing the necessary equipment, such as gloves, hairnets, and lab coats, to employees

Maintaining high levels of safety and hygiene is critical in the seafood processing industry. Any lapse in these standards can result in contaminated seafood being sold to consumers. By following the proper procedures and using the right equipment, seafood processing companies can ensure that their products are safe for consumption.

Employees are required to follow strict guidelines for personal hygiene and food safety.

It is essential that all employees in a seafood processing plant follow the strict guidelines for personal hygiene and food safety. This includes wearing gloves, hairnets, and lab coats while working. It is also important to observe proper hand-washing techniques, as improper hand-washing can lead to contamination.

Processed seafood is regularly tested for harmful bacteria and other contaminants.

Processed seafood should be regularly tested for harmful bacteria and other contaminants. This helps to ensure that the seafood is safe for consumption and will not cause any health issues.

Contaminated seafood can even be the starting point of lawsuits and other legal troubles. So, it is important for seafood processing companies to maintain the highest levels of safety and hygiene at all times. By following the proper guidelines and procedures, you can help ensure that your company produces safe, healthy seafood products.

Food poisoning is a serious issue and one that should be taken seriously by seafood processing companies. By implementing strong safety and hygiene protocols, you can help protect your employees and customers from harm. It is also important to remember that no level of contamination is acceptable in the seafood industry – so always strive for excellence when it comes to safety and hygiene.

Seafood processors work hard to ensure that their products are safe for human consumption.

Seafood companies place high importance on providing seafood that is safe to eat. In order to maintain the highest level of safety and hygiene, these companies often have rigorous safety and hygiene protocols in place. These protocols vary from company to company, but typically involve extensive cleaning and sanitizing processes.

It is important for seafood processors to maintain a high level of safety and hygiene because food poisoning can be a serious issue. Food poisoning can cause nausea, vomiting, fever, and other unpleasant symptoms. In some cases, it can even lead to death. By implementing strong safety and hygiene protocols, seafood processing companies can help protect their employees and customers from harm.